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Title details for Life After 50 by Kim Russell - Wait list

Life After 50

A Selection from the presentation given at the West Charleston Library April 9, 2010

by Kim Russell
Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Video
"There's an art to growing old," says Kim Russell, who, at four years past the dividing line, is qualified to star in the one-woman "Life After 50: Survivalist Training Required," tonight at the West Charleston Library. How about we call it growing "older," rather than, you know, "old"? "I'm all for medication now," says Russell, who, in a tone of sardonic cheerfulness, isn't one to duck the inevitabilities of aging. "I look at medication as a form of daily activity. I wasn't so keen on it before, but I've come to the realization that drugs are our friend." Her original play, which she performs anew after staging it last year at the Reed Whipple Cultural Center, is an amalgam of observations, advice and gags about life changes that aging inflicts. "For the most part, it's a monologue, an ode to getting old, and there's a sing-along or two," says Russell, a writer-producer-historian who is also the education program coordinator for the Smith Center for the Performing Arts. "This is an interactive show, it does require the audience and I to have similar memories, which means anybody under 35 could just stay home." Infrequently do performers encourage any segment of an audience to skip their shows, but Russell is addressing people who don't require that certain cultural touchstones be explained.

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Streaming video

Languages

English

"There's an art to growing old," says Kim Russell, who, at four years past the dividing line, is qualified to star in the one-woman "Life After 50: Survivalist Training Required," tonight at the West Charleston Library. How about we call it growing "older," rather than, you know, "old"? "I'm all for medication now," says Russell, who, in a tone of sardonic cheerfulness, isn't one to duck the inevitabilities of aging. "I look at medication as a form of daily activity. I wasn't so keen on it before, but I've come to the realization that drugs are our friend." Her original play, which she performs anew after staging it last year at the Reed Whipple Cultural Center, is an amalgam of observations, advice and gags about life changes that aging inflicts. "For the most part, it's a monologue, an ode to getting old, and there's a sing-along or two," says Russell, a writer-producer-historian who is also the education program coordinator for the Smith Center for the Performing Arts. "This is an interactive show, it does require the audience and I to have similar memories, which means anybody under 35 could just stay home." Infrequently do performers encourage any segment of an audience to skip their shows, but Russell is addressing people who don't require that certain cultural touchstones be explained.

Expand title description text